Beautiful Rhine Fall At Switzerland

Beautiful Rhine Fall At Switzerland

eautiful-Rhine-Fall-At-Switzerland

Dear friends, I like to introduce  you a spectacular spot which I have been to in Switzerland with my mum and grandma. It was a Europe holiday trip with many pleasant memories that are unforgettable. One of them was at River Rhine. The beauty of this river really captivated us and I highly recommend you to visit this spot.

The Rhine is the longest river in Germany and is known for its beauty, with medieval castles and pretty wine villages along its banks. But it was not like this in the past. For a long time it was heavily polluted. Part of the Rhine is part of the UNESCO cultural heritage. People used to be drawn to the Rhine for all sorts of games – even swimming, despite the dangerous currents. Legend has it that in winter, part of the Rhine freezes over and people then walk across the mighty waterway. The river begins in Switzerland. It flows through the city of Basel, forms the border between Germany and France, flows into Germany and the Netherlands, and ends in the North Sea. But after an environmental disaster 20 years ago in Switzerland, many stayed away from the water, and experts wondered if it would ever be clean again. At a recent press conference, an international commission declared that the Rhine was once again a “living” river. Pesticide pollution In 1986, a fire broke out in a storage room at the Sandoz pharmaceutical company’s manufacturing plant in the Swiss city of Basel. As a result, huge amounts of pesticides were released into the Upper Rhine, killing a variety of fish and microorganisms. The accident turned the river into the largest cesspool in Europe. Fritz Holzwarth, head of the International Commission for the Protection of the Rhine in Bonn, said the disaster was the catalyst for concern about the health of the river. “We can say that the Sandoz incident was basically the worst possible scenario that was possible at the time, and it did a lot to make water protection a major issue in politics,” he said. A daunting task Fairytale beauty along the river’s meanders It took a great deal of effort to make the river a place where people could swim again. Ultimately, it was pressure from an outraged public that forced politicians to act quickly. Since then, investment in industrial and public water treatment plants has totaled 60 billion euros (more than $75 billion), with local governments investing one billion euros annually in water treatment. The risk of another dramatic accident has been minimized because companies located along the Rhine have taken precautionary measures, Holzwarth said, adding that a proactive approach is needed to keep the river clean. “The International Commission for the Protection of the Rhine wants to work with the riparians of the river to create a perspective that allows people to live with and enjoy the river,” he said. “We want to involve the river in our lives and in those of our children,” he added. To that end, a 320-kilometer hiking trail, the Rheinsteig, was recently completed between Bonn and Koblenz. In addition, the Rhine, the most densely populated river in Europe, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It has once again become home to more than 60 different species of fish. DW recommends The gold rush on the Rhine In Neuchâtel, there is a gold-digging atmosphere on Saturdays. Then amateur treasure hunters wade into the Rhine and dig for gold. With a little luck, they bring home splinters of the precious metal. (16.10.2006) A river passes through Riverboats have access to more than 7,000 kilometers (4,350 miles) of inland waterways in Germany. Many routes are popular with travelers who want to relax on a cruise ship and watch the world go by.  Rejuvenating the Rhine A German state plans to designate part of the Rhine as a special protection zone to meet EU targets for preserving its natural habitat. The move, however, has drawn mixed reactions.

The pioneering phase. With a length of 1300 km, the Rhine is the third longest European river after the Danube and the Volga. It serves a catchment area of 170,000 km2, which extends over seven countries: Switzerland, Austria, Germany, France, Luxembourg, Belgium and the Netherlands. More than 50 million people live in this catchment today (Huisman et al. 2000; Wieriks and Schulte-Wuelwer-Leidig 1997). By the beginning of the twentieth century, the wild nature of the Rhine had been tamed so that salmon, once abundant, were nearly extinct. The Tulla Correction Project (1817-1876) played an important role in this change. Named after its architect, Johann Gottfried Tulla, the project primarily sought to stem the flooding of the river. This meant shortening the river by about 82 kilometers and unifying its width between Basel and Strasbourg to between 230 and 250 meters. This massive river project brought with it various unintended consequences, especially for the nature of the river landscape. Fish breeding grounds were damaged, and bird populations declined. Industry was attracted to the natural resources of the Rhine basin, which included vast coal deposits. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the Middle Rhine was the hardest hit; new canals were dug, railroads laid, and port facilities built to exploit these resources. In particular, the Ruhr, named after the Rhine’s tributary, became synonymous with coal and iron. In the slipstream of mining and smelting operations, the chemical industry followed, leading to ever-increasing demands for water and energy. At the turn of the century, the first steps toward electrification were taken on the High Rhine. This was an international affair from the beginning, as electricity was transmitted across borders. There are at least three reasons for this. First, the High Rhine formed the political border between Switzerland and Germany. The construction of a dam with a power plant near Rheinfelden in 1894 therefore required a bilateral agreement between the Swiss canton of Aargau and the Grand Duchy of Baden (Kleisl 2001). After Rheinfelden, ten more dams were commissioned on the High Rhine between 1912 and 1963, including the one at Laufenburg.15 Growing entrepreneurial and industrial activities gave further impetus to cross-border cooperation and rising energy demand.