Beautiful Northern Lights And Icy River

Beautiful Northern Lights And Icy River

Beautiful Northern Lights And Icy River

Some Scientific Facts About The Northern Lights

While we know why the Northern (and Southern) Lights occur today, there is still much to learn. What is the source of light in the sky? Electrically charged particles from space entering the Earth’s upper atmosphere at high speeds cause the light show we see from the ground. Our star, the sun, is the source of these particles. A stream of electrically charged particles called the solar wind is constantly emitted from the sun at speeds ranging from 300 to 500 kilometers per second. A small fraction of particles from the solar wind are intercepted by the Earth during its journey around the sun. Approximately 98% of these particles are deflected by the Earth’s magnetic field and continue their journey into deep space.

Particles that leak through the Earth’s magnetic field are funneled downwards towards the Earth’s magnetic north and south poles. As these charged particles enter our atmosphere, they become excited by the atoms and molecules high up in the atmosphere. There are two glowing rings of auroral emission around the North and South magnetic poles, known as auroral ovals. They emit distinctive colours of light as they decay back to their original state. When we view the Northern Lights, we see this light. It is easy to lose one’s self in the ethereal glow of the Northern Lights. Upon realizing the enormity of the universe, you feel small (in a good way) and filled with wonder.
What is the reason for seeing different colors? As we can see in the Northern Lights, the Earth’s atmosphere consists of different atoms, such as oxygen and nitrogen. At different levels in the atmosphere, these atoms become excited. Green is the most common color seen in the Northern Lights. We observe the green hue when millions of oxygen atoms in the Earth’s atmosphere are struck by the solar wind at the same time, causing them to be excited for a time and then decay back to their original state. Oxygen atoms are also responsible for the red light we sometimes see. As these particles are higher in the atmosphere, their red light emission is of a lower energy. Our eyes are five times less sensitive to red light than green, so we cannot always see the red color. A large part of the Earth’s atmosphere is made up of nitrogen. To excite nitrogen atoms, particles from the solar wind must strike them much harder.
As the nitrogen atoms decay, they emit a purple color. This is quite a rare colour to see, and usually only occurs during particularly active displays. You will have the best chance of seeing the lights if you are located under or near one of the auroral ovals. Getting closer to the Arctic Circle increases your chances of seeing the Northern Lights, but there are many factors to consider.
Is there a reason why we can see different colors? The Northern Lights are caused by different atoms in the Earth’s atmosphere, such as oxygen and nitrogen. At different levels in the atmosphere, these atoms become excited. Green is the most common color seen in the Northern Lights. At the same time, the solar wind excites millions of oxygen atoms in the Earth’s atmosphere, which decay back to their original state when they emit the green hue we see from the ground. Oxygen atoms are also responsible for the red light we sometimes see. As these particles are higher in the atmosphere, they emit a lower energy of red light.
Although red light is always present, our eyes are five times less sensitive to it than green light, so we are not always able to see it. The atmosphere of the Earth is largely composed of nitrogen. In order to excite nitrogen atoms, particles from the solar wind must strike them much harder. As the nitrogen atoms decay, they emit a purple-colored light. Rarely does one see this color, and it usually only occurs during particularly active displays. You will have the best chance of seeing the lights if you are located under or near an auroral oval. As we sail towards the Arctic Circle, the chances of seeing the Northern Lights increase, but there are a number of factors to take into account.

Milford Sound, New Zealand In The Night

 

Milford Sound In The Night

Milford Sound In The Night

Some Random Thoughts

I recall that my mum went to New Zealand when I was 4 to 5 years old. She was enjoying herself in New Zealand and it was a great experience for her. I am actually happy for her that she had a great experience admiring the beauty of Milford Sound.

The most important part is that we took a lot of pictures and kept them in our photo album as remembrance.

The beauty and power of photos is that they capture memories. You are able to recall many happenings and matters that are sweet and happy.

Thanks for reading my random thoughts. I am glad that you read my article and feelings. I hope you can treasure your loved ones and times together.
All The Best

Anthony Zheng Gao